Saturday, January 06, 2018

People with trusts might have to be careful when in their own name, if someone makes an fraudulent id-based claim and judgment; is overseas debt a risk?


Every few days I get an email with a spoofed sender address that purports to claim some stuff was bought using my iCloud signon.   Often they are games, and most of them are in Jakarta.  I think there has been one claim of a purchase on the Philippines (on one of the southern islands having violence), and a couple in former Soviet republics.  So it sounds like a simple phishing attack.

There is never a bill on a credit card, and I forward them to reportphishing@apple.com

I wonder, if someone had my SSN and somehow created accounts in foreign countries and ran up bills, could I ever be pursued for them?  I would think not unless I traveled to the country.

But it is possible for people to be pursued for judgments for fake accounts using their social security numbers.  In my case, I think it would be pretty easy to prove that it wasn’t me. 

Here’s the rub.  I have two trusts based on inheritances.  A lot of it is in my late mother’s name.  Some has been used to my name only, because for some future purchases that works better.  The part under mom’s trust name is supposed to be immune from creditors.  There could be a theoretical risk of seizure of money in my name only.  Inherited money might not be as well protected (if derived from an estate) for essentially “political” reasons, from tampering in a case like this.
  

I’ll check with Apple soon (at a store) and see if they know what is going on overseas.