Thursday, March 22, 2018

Could Facebook's breach lead to an identity theft risk for some users?

The enormous concerns over the recent misuse of Facebook data by British company Cambridge Analytica naturally could raise questions about possible identity theft. 

Is there really a danger?   I would think not.  Most of the data taken, even of “friends” was non-specific, such as likes or sites visited or purchases.  It generally was not PII as usually understood. So this leak is not as "dangerous" as, say, the Equifax hack. 

Some accounts say that facial images were taken.  Because facial recognition software exists, this could present a security problem for individuals.  I’ve written before here that people in bars and discos are more sensitive to photography by strangers now than they were, say, back in 2010.
However, the Identity Theft Resource Center writes essentially that there could be some risk from very determined foreign hackers who want to target someone. .  

Thursday, March 08, 2018

Russian identity theft scheme gets past usual fraud detection

Russia’s troll “animal farm” seems even more insidious that we thought a month ago.
The Russians were able to match up stolen social security numbers with driver’s licenses, Paypal, credit and bank accounts.  The Verge has a more detailed story Feb. 16 by Russell Brandom, here. 

That means that the normal fraud detection at institutions wouldn’t work.

Yet it seems as though this would involve setting up fake identities that don’t overlap the real person’s activities, otherwise it would be quickly detected.

The recent practice of porting smartphone numbers could have been involved.
I wonder about the phone call I just got offering me a $200,000 line of credit for no reason.  Is there another copy of me overseas somewhere?  Could I get arrested if I go overseas over this identity?